in

Midwifery Today Community

A home for friends of birth
Attend the Midwifery Today conference in Australia

What is a "self study"? and how?

Last post 08-03-2010 12:16 AM by NorCalRN. 20 replies.
Page 1 of 2 (21 items) 1 2 Next >
Sort Posts: Previous Next
  • 03-04-2009 5:33 PM

    • RobsGirl
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-04-2009
    • Mid-Hudson Valley, NY
    • Posts 364

    What is a "self study"? and how?

    Hi everyone,

    I've seen the term "self study" tossed around in midwifery education circles.  What exactly does this mean?  I'm guessing it means studying without the structure of a particular school.

    Since I'm not ready to undertake any formal midwifery education, but also, while my "passion is still high" (as Jan Tritten put it in her blog recently when addressing the question of how to get a midwifery education while still tending to small children, homeschooling, etc) I'd really like to use this time to do a self-study in midwifery so that I might have an easier time when the day comes to enroll or embark on an apprenticeship (or not...only God knows).  I love to read, especially about birth, so this actually sounds great to me: 

    1)  I need a list of recommended books, materials, etc, so I can borrow them and get started

    2)  What other learning tools might be useful in helping me retain what I'm reading i.e. notetaking, outlining, anatomy coloring books, etc...or is reading sufficient?

    Thank you,

    RobsGirl, 31
    Wife of one fabulous guy (34)
    Mommy of 3 awesome boys, ages 11, 8, and 4, and a precious 2 year old daughter.


  • 03-05-2009 6:44 AM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

     

    I am studying through AAMI and *love* it.  But, if you are going to study on your own, I would recommend Holistic Midwifery 1 and 2.  They are full of good information.

    Vicki - wife to Chris, mom to eleven, doula and midwifery student.
  • 03-05-2009 7:56 AM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    Books you should read to get started, if you haven't already

    -Spiritual Midwifery by Ina May Gaskin

    -Heart and Hands by Elizabeth Davis

    -Immaculate Deception by Suzanne Arms

    I also just bought Varney's Midwifery for my apprenticeship - you can preview it on Google, it is an excellent textbook.

     

    I have more suggestions, post more in a bit, my 2yo wants me!

     

    mother to a shining precious one
    and beginning my midwifery apprenticeship in March!
  • 03-05-2009 8:24 AM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    More books related to the subject-

    Anything by Sheila Kitzinger - I like Homebirth a lot

    Mayes is a good textbook that I've read parts of in the past.

    Birthing From Within by Pam England

    Baby Catcher by Peggy Vincent is just a fun read about the life of a midwife in San Francisco

     

    I'm not all that far into my studies so I'm not a true wealth of info yet.  Just read read read read everything you can, search the internet for interesting topics related to midwifery, read studies and articles.  Maybe try your hand as a doula, start a self-paced doula training course, which can be expensive but it's a lot of good info.  I am doing a course with Childbirth International, after researching all the different programs out there, this was the best for me.  There is BirthArts, ICEA, DONA, ALACE, Childbirth International, on and on and on.  Once you start training you could maybe be able to attend a birth here and there as a doula to get some birth experience in and to help out some good people.

     

    Just some thoughts!  If I think of anything more I'll post it.

     

    mother to a shining precious one
    and beginning my midwifery apprenticeship in March!
  • 03-08-2009 9:34 AM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    I think a good way to self study would be to make your own modules on things. So like shoulder dystocia and then you would look in every textbook you have and online and all your resources to learn everything about shoulder dystocia.... what causes it, what methods you should use to fix it, what damage can be done, if it can be prevented, write a handout if you feel it would be helpful, write your protocols for it, etc. And then move onto the next issue.

    Textbooks I would recommends for sure: Myles, Mayes, Varney's, and everything by Anne Frye. Also if you can get any obstetric texts, they would be helpful. A medical dictionary is pretty vital as well. I watch Amazon to pick up textbooks for $0.01 when I can find ones that look helpful to me.

     

    just a mom and a midwife
  • 03-08-2009 10:12 AM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    I recommend:

    Varney's
    Holistic Midwifery Vol 1 & 2
    Myles Textbook for Midwives
    Oxorn-Foote Human Labor & Birth
    Understanding Diagnostic Tests for the Childbearing Year
    Skills for Midwifery Practice
    Heart & Hands
    The Placenta: To Know Me is To Love Me
    (very HTF and out of print, but a very interesting text)
    Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering
    by Sarah Buckley
    Prescription for Nutritional Healing

    tons of others.... but that gets you started.  :lol

     

    As far as midwives' memoirs, I love Baby Catcher and Lady's Hands, Lion's Heart 

    I am a CPM in solo home birth practice
  • 03-08-2009 10:56 AM In reply to

    • midwifea
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-12-2009
    • Kailua Kona, HI
    • Posts 476

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    Robsgirl,

    I have a wonderful new apprentice and on her journey we are using Carla Hartley's, Helping Hands Workbook, available at AAMI as an ebook for about $75 (forgot the exact price)  It has been a blessing for her.  She also, on my recommend, got family at Christmas, to gift her with Anne Frye's whole series, not great study models but invaluable information and resources.  I more often than anything else use Anne's books as resource.  Henci Goer's books are priceless and some of my all time favorite midwifery reads are Michel Odent.The Farmer and the Obstetrician was light years ahead of it's time.   For now, with her children's ages and family needs, it is working really well.  She has support to come to births and prenatals and that coupled with the reading and our coffee study dates is putting her well on the road to her goals.

    I was herbally trained and herbal books/workshops are also important concurrent studies to add to your midwifery life.

    (just tried to de-italicize the above and can't make that work, sorry)

    Blessings,
    April
    moderator

    "The Voice

    There is a voice inside of you
    That whispers all day long,
    "I feel this is right for me,
    I know that this is wrong."
    No teacher, preacher, parent, friend
    Or wise man can decide
    What's right for you--just listen to
    The voice that speaks inside."
    — Shel Silverstein
  • 03-09-2009 7:14 AM In reply to

    • RobsGirl
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-04-2009
    • Mid-Hudson Valley, NY
    • Posts 364

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    Everyone, THANK YOU.  I'm adding all your suggestions fo my list.  Hotwings, thanks for the module suggestion and writing out handouts or protocols.  Very good idea.  If there's anything else I could do while reading to help me retain information, please keep the ideas coming.

    April, thanks so much for your suggestions as well.  Thankfully, I have some of these books already and have read them.  I'll re-read them, though, with a different perspective (think I was pregnant when I was reading them before).  I would definately want to pursue more herbal studies as well.  Actually, reading and dabbling in herbs for women's health was what first got me interested in midwifery.  So I've got some knowlege on that but would love more.

    Thank you, all.  [I'm not shutting this thread...please keep it coming] but just wanted to stop in and say thanks.

    RobsGirl, 31
    Wife of one fabulous guy (34)
    Mommy of 3 awesome boys, ages 11, 8, and 4, and a precious 2 year old daughter.


  • 03-13-2009 6:59 PM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    I'm glad you asked this Robsgirl, it answered some of my questions and let me know what I should be reading.

    Thanks everybody!

  • 03-16-2009 2:10 PM In reply to

    • RobsGirl
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-04-2009
    • Mid-Hudson Valley, NY
    • Posts 364

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    I just found another way to get lists...

    When I looked on Amazon for one of the Varney textbooks, a few "listmania"s popped up so I took a look at those.  There are lots of great suggestions there too.

    RobsGirl, 31
    Wife of one fabulous guy (34)
    Mommy of 3 awesome boys, ages 11, 8, and 4, and a precious 2 year old daughter.


  • 04-07-2009 12:14 PM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    MotherNurtured:

    I recommend:

    Varney's
    Holistic Midwifery Vol 1 & 2
    Myles Textbook for Midwives
    Oxorn-Foote Human Labor & Birth
    Understanding Diagnostic Tests for the Childbearing Year
    Skills for Midwifery Practice
    Heart & Hands
    The Placenta: To Know Me is To Love Me
    (very HTF and out of print, but a very interesting text)
    Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering
    by Sarah Buckley
    Prescription for Nutritional Healing

    tons of others.... but that gets you started.  :lol

     

    As far as midwives' memoirs, I love Baby Catcher and Lady's Hands, Lion's Heart 

     

    I'm going to second this list! It's a great "starting" point.

     

    What I did for my "self study" was to read textbooks from cover to cover, slowly, while taking notes, and looking stuff up, crossrefencing ect. When you read a textbook from cover to cover, you've read what one group of people (the makers of the textbook) think is a complete (entry level) midwifery education. That way, you don't miss any super important chunks acidentally. Everytime I would read a new textbook it would solidify what I had already learned from the previous one, and maybe add some bits here and there and offer new perspectives... and of course, with each text it got easier and easier to get through! Once I got past a very basic level I threw in some more advanced and topic based books as well like Sarah Wickham's Anti-D in Midwifery, or just a basic "Physical Assessment of the Newborn", so that I could go deeper into those topics.

    While I highly recommend Anne Frye's books, I do not recommend beginning with Holistic Midwifery vol II. It is a very thick (literally and figuratively) book that can make things more confusing at first. I really enjoyed reading Varney's 4th ed. - it is super straightforward and well written, easy to get through!

    good luck to you!

     

     

  • 04-16-2009 3:05 PM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    One of the things I am studying right now is anatomy. I found a really cheap, recent copy of Gray's Anatomy at my local library, and I found a free coloring book (excellent) online, but I am not sure how long it will stay there. It is downloadable. :)
    http://www.scribd.com/doc/8250120/Kaplan-Anatomy-Coloring-Book

    I also have been using a free 3D anatomy website, http://www.visiblebody.com/

    I have also enjoyed reading A Book for Midwives, put out by the Hesperian Foundation. There are even a few printable tools in the book. :)
    http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download_midwives.php

    Those are just free resources though. I have learned a lot from some of the books recommended by the ladies here as well (I haven't read all of them yet!).

  • 04-17-2009 11:47 PM In reply to

    • CTaymor
    • Top 100 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-09-2009
    • SF Bay Area
    • Posts 11

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    Does anyone know how big a difference the new versions make?  there are a lot of really inexpensive copies of myles, but they're 20+ years old. Anyone know if the material is significantly different? Is it worth getting an old copy to start with, since I can afford it now, and then if I need a newer edition, down the road?  So many of these are going on my perpetual "books gift wishlist" lol. Thanks

    ~Aspiring Midwife~Looking into training options and learning like a sponge~
  • 04-18-2009 6:48 AM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    Yes, there are big differences in editions. Especially with a span of 20 years. I have an 9th ed. Myles and a 14th ed. and I can hardly believe they are the same book. Not that the old ones are not worth having! They have outdated information though - maybe not so great to start studying with, but super interesting nonetheless.

     

  • 04-21-2009 1:42 PM In reply to

    Re: What is a "self study"? and how?

    Wow! There's a lot of good advice here!

    I would recommend reading, Becoming a Midwife by Carolyn Steiger, The Thinking Woman's Guide to a Better Birth by Henci Goer, and Helping Hands by Carla Hartley. Subscribe to Midwifery Today if you haven't already.

    Also, Carla Hartley has some yahoo reading groups you might consider joining. You don't have to be enrolled in her school, but you cannot currently be a student of any other midwifery school.

    Careful notetaking with page numbers will be invaluable later on.

    I wish you well in your journey!

    Daughter of the KING
    Oldest of ELEVEN siblings
    Student Midwife
    I blog at http://nofrumpinessallowed.blogspot.com
Page 1 of 2 (21 items) 1 2 Next >
Subscribe to Midwifery Today magazine
Contact UsTerms of UsePrivacy PolicyAbout Us
© 2014 Midwifery Today, Inc.