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Challenge to sustain birthing centre in Nepal

Last post 08-09-2011 6:21 AM by Laxmi. 4 replies.
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  • 06-27-2011 12:04 AM

    • Laxmi
    • Top 100 Contributor
    • Joined on 01-12-2010
    • Kathmandu, Nepal
    • Posts 10

    Challenge to sustain birthing centre in Nepal

    Dear Midwive Friends, 

    My name is Laxmi Tamang from Nepal. I'm one of the founding member of the first and only nurse-midwives led independent birthing centre in Nepal and the Midwifery Society of Nepal, established in 2007 and 2010 respectively.

    We are struggling to sustain our birthing centre because of the financial constraint that we are facing. We are not a donor funded. We have established our centre as a social enterprise contributing US $ 1333 individually by each of 11 founder members to set up and run the centre. From the very beginning we have very good cooperation and collaboration with the government of Nepal. Government supply us family planning devices, vaccines and we also have signed Memorandum of Understanding with them to provide free maternity care to women who come to give birth in our centre. Therefore, we provide free of cost maternity care to all women who deliver in our centre. We provide whole range of sexual and reproductive health services to urban poor families. These include family planning, antenatal care, delivery, postnatal care, safe abortion care, immunisation, STI treatment and management, etc.

    In Nepal, so far we know two birthing centres established by two big hospitals, namely Patan Hospital and Stupa Community Hospital have been closed down due to number of reasons and we don't want to add up with this stories.

    Therefore, we are seeking help from you all to make our effort sustainable to help women to give birth as per their choices and empower and build confident of nurses to work independently. In Nepal, we don't have a midwife so nurses provide maternity care including others. 

    I would appreciate if you could help us volunteering your time if you are travelling to Nepal.

    Look forward to getting your support.

    Best regards

    Laxmi Tamang, RN, MPH
    Founding member
    Midwifery Society of Nepal
    Website: http//www.midson.org
    and
    Founding Manager
    APS Birthing Centre
    Khashi Bazar, Kalanki, Kathmandu-14
    PO Box 8975, EPC 2946
    Kalanki, Kathmandu, Nepal
    Email: laxtshering@yahoo.com
    Website: http//www.apskendra.org.np/Contact
    Blog: http//www.laxmitamang.blogspot.com
  • 07-28-2011 4:44 AM In reply to

    Re: Challenge to sustain birthing centre in Nepal

    Nasmaste Laxmi Tamang,

    I am not a midwife yet, but if  if there is something for someone who is not a midwife to do at your birth center, I am very interested in volunteering this fall. I have trained as a doula and plan to apply to midwifery school when I return to the states. 

    I am currently traveling in Nepal and will be available October, November, and if I can get another visa extension, December. I am on a tourist visa, but would change types if I am advised how to do so. 
    I have read through your blog and am quite impressed by all your inspiring work. I have also been taking Nepali lessons and have learned a minor amount so far.
    Thank you for your time.
    Caroline Mellor 

  • 08-05-2011 12:19 PM In reply to

    • Laxmi
    • Top 100 Contributor
    • Joined on 01-12-2010
    • Kathmandu, Nepal
    • Posts 10

    Re: Challenge to sustain birthing centre in Nepal

    Yes, that is very true. However, in Nepal we need more birth centre, especially in rural areas to ensure access to maternity services to laboring women as well as to empower and build confident of nurses (since we don't have a separate cadre of midwife in Nepal) to work independently. The video film "Birth in Nepal" illustrates this succinctly. To learn more Birth in Nepal at http://english.aljazeera.net/programmes/witness/2010/05/20105372154435803.html.

    Laxmi Tamang, RN, MPH
    Founding member
    Midwifery Society of Nepal
    Website: http//www.midson.org
    and
    Founding Manager
    APS Birthing Centre
    Khashi Bazar, Kalanki, Kathmandu-14
    PO Box 8975, EPC 2946
    Kalanki, Kathmandu, Nepal
    Email: laxtshering@yahoo.com
    Website: http//www.apskendra.org.np/Contact
    Blog: http//www.laxmitamang.blogspot.com
  • 08-09-2011 5:28 AM In reply to

    • natuke
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on 08-09-2011
    • Posts 1

    Re: Challenge to sustain birthing centre in Nepal

    Hi, lineline

    I am in Kathmandu and I am studying at Birth Arts to be a doula. I am also thinking to become a midwife but not sure if it's gonna work :). 

    I know Laxmi, know the birth center and another lady who is responsible for it and I am thinking about doing my 5 accreditation deliveries there, during this fall. If you want, when you are in Kathmandu, get in touch.  We can connect with midwives who are in charge of the center and see if/how we could help. 

    Blessings

    Natasha, kolnata@gmail.com

    Laxmi, I just started watching the documentary, it's all so very sad :(

  • 08-09-2011 6:21 AM In reply to

    • Laxmi
    • Top 100 Contributor
    • Joined on 01-12-2010
    • Kathmandu, Nepal
    • Posts 10

    Re: Challenge to sustain birthing centre in Nepal

     Natasha,

    Hope you and your kids are well. Thanks for being in touch with Caroline Mellor (her name is not lineline). You can reach to her at line.mellor@gmail.com. She is right now at Pokhara and on the process of extending her visa. You might be interested to watch the video titled

    "Chaupadi: A Sexist Custom" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v​=kqO6XQwsgt4&utm_source=fb0531​11am&utm_medium=video&utm_camp​aign=chaupadi filmed by UNFPA Nepal. In Nepal, Chaupadi forces women to be isolated in small, unventilated mud sheds during menstruation or after child birth. The custom is based on the belief that menstruating women are unclean and could spread their impurity.
    Just to let you know that Chau means menses and padi means hut/shelter it is a language use in Karnali region (Jumla, Humal, Accham, Bajura, etc) of Nepal.
     
    Professor Mahmoud Fathalla from Federation of International Gynaecologist and Obstetrician quoted "Women are not dying because of diseases we cannot treat... they are dying because societies have yet to make the decision that their lives are worth saving" is very true in the context of Nepal. I'm saying this because though in the National Policy on Skilled Birth Attendants 2006 in the long-term (Pre-service) measure it has explicitly mentioned that the Government of Nepal has acknowledged the need of producing a new cadre of professional midwife as a crucial human resource for safe motherhood, providing service and leadership in midwifery for the country but still this has not yet been operationalise. We only have 4.5 more years to achieve the set targets of the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals 4, reducing child deaths and 5, improving maternal health and still majority, 81% Nepalese women are giving birth at home without the assistance of skilled health workers in Nepal.

    It is also worthwhile reading the World Bank Report about "Investing in Maternal Health: Learning from Malaysia and Sir Lanka", which you can download from http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2007/08/28/000020439_20070828164038/Rendered/PDF/259010REPLACEM10082135362401PUBLIC1.pdf.
    Laxmi Tamang, RN, MPH
    Founding member
    Midwifery Society of Nepal
    Website: http//www.midson.org
    and
    Founding Manager
    APS Birthing Centre
    Khashi Bazar, Kalanki, Kathmandu-14
    PO Box 8975, EPC 2946
    Kalanki, Kathmandu, Nepal
    Email: laxtshering@yahoo.com
    Website: http//www.apskendra.org.np/Contact
    Blog: http//www.laxmitamang.blogspot.com
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