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direct-entry programs

Last post 07-25-2009 6:59 PM by MotherNurtured. 61 replies.
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  • 03-09-2009 12:21 PM In reply to

    • RobsGirl
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-04-2009
    • Mid-Hudson Valley, NY
    • Posts 364

    Re: direct-entry programs

    I guess that's what I like about NARM/CPM more for clients to see some sort of "credentials", than for a legal issue.  I'd be illegal in NY even if I was a CPM, but at least I'd have met some basic standard, as you said. 

    This is all food for thought. 

    Thanks for the input on AAMI mothernurtured.  Their structure seems really cool.  Just not ready to fork out the money yet.  :-)

    RobsGirl, 31
    Wife of one fabulous guy (34)
    Mommy of 3 awesome boys, ages 11, 8, and 4, and a precious 2 year old daughter.


  • 03-09-2009 11:01 PM In reply to

    Re: direct-entry programs

     I guess I am sticking my toe over the line and asking just who does get to tell me who I am!!  When I meet with a client,I tell them what I am and what I am not.  I ask them what they need/want and get very real about what I will or won't do.[fortunately Michigan is a open state.]  The only way to be accepted as midwives[with women]is to do it.  Look at the unassisted birth movement that is saying I am an adult and I can be trusted with my body.  I can make good decisions for ME,and I can be responsible for those decisions.  We are mamals and we do know how to birth.  Research shows that women will make good safe plans and carry them out if they are left alone to do so.  Read some of Henci Goer's books[my favorite is Obstretric Myths VS Research Realities]  Read Michael Odent's books.  Women pick positions that facilitate their birth,not everyone elses but their birth.  And I can bet you a bunch it won't be in the dead cockroach position[flat on back,feet in the air]  In times past women picked some calm woman do be with her.  That woman tended to get called again,and so she became a midwife.

    Did things go wrong  Of course they did.  Have Dr. learned to help the few women who need help?  Yes most assuredly.  Do we need Drs. and hosp. who can help?  Yes we do and there is nothing more heart stopping than the things that can go wrong and when the team shows up.  What you learn is when something is wrong and what to do about it.  It is hard to make people believe that there is usually time to deal with the going bad things before they are BAD.   Those real emergencies,can happen anywhere and most of them it wouldn't matter where you are,they will happen.

    It is just that women do not need to all have all the bells and whistles just because we know how!  Makes as much sense as taking every person with a small laceration to ICU just in care something terrirle happens. 

    Back to how you get to be a midwife.  I think what ever works for you is right.  I think women come to their calling in different ways.  I just object to being separated and  labeled like prize cattle. I think that wheither you are a direct entry,lay,BSN. what ever.  It is a divide and keep us busy fighting among our selves move on the part of the big important in folks. with initials.

       I also think that a woman is safer to be in her own house that a hospital.  [My step daughter and her baby got MRSA this summer at one of the finnest hosps. in the land]It is because of just such issues that I believe most anybody attending them would be better than what is being done to young woman at a terrible price in real money and the after affects.  So just do it folks.

    claudia

    Women and cats will do as they please and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea. - Robert A Heinlein
  • 03-10-2009 9:29 AM In reply to

    • midwifea
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-12-2009
    • Kailua Kona, HI
    • Posts 475

    Re: direct-entry programs

    (Sound of hands clapping)  Nice, Claudia!

    Tradititional midwives were regulated by the community they serve. I feel grass roots homebirth needs this woman in her community. I do not want any initials after my name.  I do not want the government in the birthing room with us.  I want capable, confident women serving other women.  It is not a calling for everyone.  The route by which we get there is different for each woman.  We need more midwives.  The confusing types of education and certifications just give rise to less confidence among our young women and a high drop out rate. We need to remember our roots and let go of the fear.

    Some times I feel like it's watching a bunch of men or governments argue about the best way to change a baby, how to insure it's done safely, correctly, and everyone involved gets adequate compensation while a real woman just steps up and changes the dang baby.  Sorry for the tirade but I am just in a menopausal stinky mood.  Claudia and I should go have a cuppa.

    Blessings,
    April
    moderator

    "The Voice

    There is a voice inside of you
    That whispers all day long,
    "I feel this is right for me,
    I know that this is wrong."
    No teacher, preacher, parent, friend
    Or wise man can decide
    What's right for you--just listen to
    The voice that speaks inside."
    — Shel Silverstein
  • 03-10-2009 12:40 PM In reply to

    Re: direct-entry programs

    Great posts Claudia and April!

     

    Mary

  • 03-11-2009 9:11 AM In reply to

    • Hypnomama
    • Top 50 Contributor
    • Joined on 01-28-2009
    • Kitsap Peninsula, WA
    • Posts 20

    Re: direct-entry programs

    "It is hard to make people believe that there is usually time to deal with the going bad things before they are BAD.   Those real emergencies,can happen anywhere and most of them it wouldn't matter where you are,they will happen."

    I think that in that time we have that we spend with women in relationship during their birth year there are so many ways that we practice "preventative" care.  Healthy Mama, Healthy Baby, Healthy Community.

    I think it's easy when you start down the journey toward liscensure to focus on aspects of your experience and let that control they way you "do" midwifery.  Some educational routes seem to have a larger focus on fear of prosecution.  I think that if your intention is to have midwifery relationships where you encourage the woman to own her birth experience 100% then an educational route that focused on that wouldnt resonate well with you.  I know that women know how to birth. 

    Personally, I choose not to fight MEAC.  I have a background in technology and live in the land of Microsoft.  When you have 2 of the best midwifery programs in the US and live in the same state as MEAC, it just seems like commonsense.  Im already bucking the system by not going to Seattle Midwifery (which I think is a great school - just not for me at this time in my life of having a young family).  I really like National College of Midwifery, but there are alot of midwives withing a couple hours of me.  That program requires much more of a commitment by the preceptor to teach and only take on a single student.

    I think that for me, what the distance programs lack are study groups and hands on practice... so it is important to have a great preceptor.  I feel super lucky to have one ;)  I'm trying to arrange monthly skills labs here in the Kitsap/Tacoma area so that those of us going nontraditional routes would have community.   

    Anyway,
    Thanks so much Claudia and April for your messages.

    Warmly,
    Alex
  • 03-12-2009 8:46 AM In reply to

    Re: direct-entry programs

    Hi Jenni,

    I am attending Aviva Institute. After years of researching schools I have found what I need in this one. It is very thorough, accessable and the instructors are wonderful! Daphne Singingtree is the school director and a lot of the instructors have worked with Narm. They are in the process of being Meac approved and obtaining their Title 5 funding. There is a new session starting next month. You do have to have certain prereqs such as A&P. Hope this helps.

     

    Terresa

  • 03-13-2009 3:26 PM In reply to

    Re: direct-entry programs

     Thank you Claudia, April... thank you to all of you!!!

    After the pre-conference, I am riding a raw wave of release. And now after reading these recent posts, I know I must share it with you all!

    It's as if I've been enlightened by the simple acceptance of my very own insticts. Just as my dream is to support the intuitive nature of mothers all over the world, I've realized that I, too, must listen to mine. I know that I am called to midwifery service. When I tune out all the static of acronymns, accredidations, and politics, I can still hear that beautiful voice calling to me. It's my heart that has brought me to this path, and it's my heart that will guide me down it. And the more faith and trust I put in my own intuition, the stronger my pulse throbs within me. My labor, my birth into midwifery will be different from every one of yours. It's our differences, our unique experiences and spirits, that make us so immensly beautiful. No matter how often I have read that or told myself that, I don't think I truly accepted it until now. No matter how we train, who we apprentice with, how we learn, where we travel... we are one. No matter what laws tell us, what governments call us, or what Fear says about us... we are one. Feel the force we create when we abandon all pseudo-names and just thrive on the same fierce, yet humble blood that binds us all. We are sisters. We are Midwives!! Throughout all our chatting and searching, may we never forget how truly individual and yet truly connected we all are.

    Blessings and Love,

    Chelsea

    "Above all, I wanted to implant the secret of love in your hearts. I hoped to teach you to be brothers to all living things, and to become so full of love that you will not fear even sorrow and death and receive them like brothers and sisters as they come to you."
    --Hermann Hesse, 'Peter Camenzind'
  • 03-13-2009 3:29 PM In reply to

    Re: direct-entry programs

    LOVELY!!!!

     

    Mary

  • 03-13-2009 9:31 PM In reply to

    • midwifea
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-12-2009
    • Kailua Kona, HI
    • Posts 475

    Re: direct-entry programs

    Beautiful Chelsea,

    in MT winter 08 there was an article about two Amish midwives, here's the link:  

    http://www.midwiferytoday.com/articles/ed_molly_mary.asp

    They call themselves CCM's, community created midwives.  I really like that.

    Stay true!

     

    Blessings,
    April
    moderator

    "The Voice

    There is a voice inside of you
    That whispers all day long,
    "I feel this is right for me,
    I know that this is wrong."
    No teacher, preacher, parent, friend
    Or wise man can decide
    What's right for you--just listen to
    The voice that speaks inside."
    — Shel Silverstein
  • 04-28-2009 9:27 AM In reply to

    Re: direct-entry programs

     

    I have done the PEP process with a busy homebirth midwife and will have attended 50 births at the end of my year (which is next week) and have done the majority of prenatals from the beginning of their care, handled postpartum care and newborn care with all of these mamas as well. I have caught the marjority of these babies solo, my preceptor being there but me doing the work. I feel very prepared to take on clients at this point especially knowing there is a community of senior midwives to consult with if something comes up I haven't dealt with yet.

    Kim Trower, DEM
    Mother to Mother Midwifery Care
  • 05-21-2009 11:54 PM In reply to

    Re: direct-entry programs

    If I were choosing a midwifery program now, I would choose AAMI or Womancraft in MA.  But I agree that we all need to find the path that's right for us and strive to serve women as best we can whatever certification or education we pursue.

  • 06-03-2009 12:56 PM In reply to

    • BethMoon
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on 06-03-2009
    • Amherst, MA
    • Posts 1

    Re: direct-entry programs

    You are correct that there are several routes to becoming a CPM midwife through NARM.

    One route is to attend a MEAC accredited school which would include your academics and your apprenticeship/clinical work. As part of a MEAC program you will take the NARM exam and finish with your CPM. A few states require CPMs to have attended a MEAC school.MEAC school are generally a several year commitment and a larger financial commitment. It is a great structure for those who can commit to a few years of school, have the financial ability to pay for a MEAC school and want everything to be all inclusive.

    The second route to getting your CPM through NARM is to complete the PEP (Portfolio Evaluation Process). To do this you need to have acedmic study (which can be a program, mulitple programs, self study and/or a combination of these) and to complete an apprenticeship/clinical rotation. Students who complete the PEP process are given a log book by NARM and thet records all the workshops and classes they attend as well as skills they study and births/prenatals etc that they attend. Once a student has complete the required prerequisites and has references and recommendations signed by senior midwives they can sit for the NARM exam and complete their CPM. Many states use the CPM credential as their licensure standard. (Some states currently require nothing to practice legally). The PEP process is a good choice for those who have a wide variety of experience, who are part way through the process already or who can not commit to a full on MEAC school and need an alternative path.

    I have been the director of an academic program, the WomanCraft Midwifery Program http://www.womancraft.org for students midwives for 9 years and had many students and several apprentices of my own over the years go on to become CPMs through the PEP process. It is pretty straight forward.

    If you want to become a CPM (or a homebirth midwife with or without the CPM credential) you should think seriously about where you will be living and practicing in the future and research the state regulations there. MANA has a great chart that lists the legal status of midwives by state http://mana.org/statechart.html

    Beth Anne Moonstone, CPM

     

     

     

     

    Beth Anne Moonstone, CPM, Midwife
    WomanCraft Midwifery Education Program womancraft.org
    Amherst Homebirth Midwifery
    www.amherstmidwifery.com
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