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lay-midwifery ?

Last post 02-11-2009 9:17 AM by MotherNurtured. 7 replies.
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  • 01-29-2009 8:28 PM

    lay-midwifery ?

    Hello

    Are there any states, within the union of 50, that don't regulate midwifery?  Is lay-midwifery completely forbidden throughout our country?

    Sure am glad that 'ya'll' are up and running again!!! 

    Look forward to hearing from all of you knowledgeable ladies.

    Thanks

     

    Laurel
    Happy wife of one fantastic husband
    Joyful mother of 8 wonderful children
    Psalm 111:4
  • 01-29-2009 10:33 PM In reply to

    • azores
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 01-30-2009
    • West Coast
    • Posts 121

    Re: lay-midwifery ?

    I did a search to see which states allowed Direct Entry Midwifery

    http://mana.org/statechart.html

     

  • 01-29-2009 10:33 PM In reply to

    • Hypnomama
    • Top 50 Contributor
    • Joined on 01-28-2009
    • Kitsap Peninsula, WA
    • Posts 20

    Re: lay-midwifery ?

     Im pretty sure that here in WA you can be a lay midwife as long as you follow certain rules.  You cannot ask for money, nor can you administer drugs outside of the good samaritan law.  You cant preform surgery (episiotomy).. You cannot advertise as a midwife...Im sure there are other things, Ill have to ask one who is actively lay.

    Im pretty sure OR is friendly too.

    Warmly,
    Alex
  • 02-05-2009 10:52 PM In reply to

    Re: lay-midwifery ?

    My last midwife is a lay midwife. I'm in Oregon. It is legal for her to practice here, but she cannot bill insurance or Medicaid like the licensed midwives do.

    Blessings,
    Toni
  • 02-07-2009 10:43 AM In reply to

    Re: lay-midwifery ?

    I'm interested in knowing what the pro's and con's are to being a lay midwife vs. being a licensed midwife.  

    ~ Lamaze CBE ~ CNM student ~
  • 02-07-2009 11:29 AM In reply to

    Re: lay-midwifery ?

    I've used both for my births, and have looked into both paths a bit on my own journey.

     

    CPMs: You know they have met a standard of training to attain their CPM. In Oregon, they can also accept Medicaid, so more women can afford them. They can legally carry equipment that may be needed at a birth like Pitocin to help a sluggish placenta out. They also must follow state guidelines as to how they practice, for instance, if a woman goes past 42 weeks, they must refer them to an OB. If they don't, they are operating outside the scope of their practice and they may run the risk of losing their license if they are reported. Other states may mandate that they don't do VBAC, multiples or breech. The CPMs I have worked with have been very competent and caring. They knew what to do when they needed to take matters into their hands and when they could sit back.

     

    Lay midwives: You need to ascertain whether their level of expertise yourself. They are not constrained to all the rules because they have no license to lose. At the same time, they should never attempt something they are not trained for... for instance, if the are not trained in suturing, they should tell a woman that before the birth, so if she does tear, she knows she may need to transfer for repair. An example is the last midwife I had... she was a lay midwife. She told me upfront that she did not suture. She did not do breech, although she knew a licensed midwife who was trained to do them that she could refer me to if needed.What I really liked is she was not under any time constraints. She trusted my own observations during my pregnancy, and did not need to do x number of vaginal exams for her paperwork during labor. She had the freedom to rely on observation rather than interruptions.

     

    As a future practitioner, most midwives that want to attend homebirths seem to be following the CPM path. It is straightforward, and helps them know when they are considered ready to practice, as well as giving them legality in many places. Becoming a lay midwife is a bit less clear, not only because you are the one that must determine when you are ready to practice, but because they seem to be the target of every group to illustrate the stereotype of the illiterate, uneducated midwife. I did not find that to be anywhere near the case with the one I have worked with, and I know of others who have worked in my area in the past who are very knowledgeable and well-trained. They just chose not to have to work within the constraints of the state guidelines.

     

    I do think it is imperative that any midwife, no matter what letters are behind her name, should be straightforward with their clients and let them know what they are comfortable handling.

    Blessings,
    Toni
  • 02-07-2009 5:12 PM In reply to

    Re: lay-midwifery ?

    Laurel,

    Thanx for postin an thread on this.  I'm with the others on this.  Not sure whats the law in NJ or etc and would love to know what it is/are.

     

     

     

  • 02-11-2009 9:17 AM In reply to

    Re: lay-midwifery ?

    reikibirth:

    As a future practitioner, most midwives that want to attend homebirths seem to be following the CPM path. It is straightforward, and helps them know when they are considered ready to practice, as well as giving them legality in many places. Becoming a lay midwife is a bit less clear ...snip... stereotype of the illiterate, uneducated midwife.

    I agree.  I am choosing to become a CPM for a variety of reasons but the targeting of lay midwives is one of them.  And the over-achiever in me wants people to know that I am fully-trained and that my knowledge and training have been verified.  Now, most lay midwives these days would be trained by another midwife who would tell them when to cut the strings and go out on her own so they are not always without guidance.  My own midwife trained by apprenticeship only and although she could, she has chosen not to become a CPM.  By the time I finish my apprenticeship and NARM paperwork, I will have worked with at least four different midwives (quite possible 5-6) and I think that's a good thing.

    Currently, in Indiana, only CNMs can practice legally... and I believe the ones who attend homebirths have to have physician collaboration which can be hard to come by at times.  It is a class D felony for a DEM or CPM to practice.

    I am a CPM in solo home birth practice
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